Author Archives: Lily Chen

 Lily Chen Song Choice for Feed

The song I chose to connect to Feed is “Mind Control” by Stephen Marley. Titus and the others were controlled by feed. It informs their thoughts and keeps them ignorant, which matches the lyric “Mind control, it’s mind control/ Corruption of your thoughts, yeah/ Destruction of your soul”. The loss of individuality in feed can also be connected to the lyric, “Don’t let them mold your mind/ They wanna control mankind/ Seems like their only intention/ Is to exploit the earth”. Furthermore, the lyric “Propaganda and lies are a plague in our lives” accurately describes how I felt and observed feed after reading it. 

Lyrics

Yeah, yeah, yeah, now tell you what

It’s mind control, mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul

Mind control, it’s mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul

Don’t let them mold your mind
They wanna control mankind
Seems like their only intention
Is to exploit the earth, yeah

And you trust in their deceit
Your mind causes your defeat
And so you become an invention
To distort this earth

Propaganda and lies
Is a plague in our lives
How much more victimized
Before we realize? Hey

It’s mind control, mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul

Mind control, it’s mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul

Ooh, Grandmaster
Let the people go
You put them in total confusion
To downs-troy their soul

For they practice what You preach
So they’re always in Your reach
Hi-tech slavery in these days
It’s mind control

They’ll make it attractive to get man distracted
Corrupting your soul, polluting your soul
Destroying your soul, mind control

Mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul

Mind control, it’s mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul

Yeah, yeah, yeah
Come on and get it together, brother man
What, what you say?

It’s mind control, mind control
Corruption of your thoughts
Yeah, yeah, destruction of your soul

Mind control, it’s mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul

It’s mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul

It’s mind control
Corruption of your thoughts, yeah
Destruction of your soul
(The truth is there for us to see, the truth is there for us to see)

Blog #2: Challenger Deep by Lily Chen

I chose “Unwell” by Matchbox Twenty because I feel like many of the lyrics can be connected to Challenger Deep and the quotes we discussed in class. For example, we discussed the quote “I would much rather everyone think I was a prophet than some poor sick kid” (Shuterman, 208), and I think it shares a similar idea to the line “But I’m not crazy, I’m just a little unwell.” Even leaving the idea of mental illness aside, we may experience negative emotions such as depression and anxiety from time to time. However, this does not imply that we are insane; rather, we are simply unwell. In addition, the verse “I’m talkin’ to myself in public, dodging glances on the train/And I know, I know they’ve all been talking about me” reminds me of scenes in the book that allow us to get a sense of Caden’s mental illness when Caden thinks of his family as monsters with masks on and believes that there was this boy who wanted to kill him. The line “right now you can’t tell” reminds me of when we discussed why Caden’s family assumed Caden was suffering from something other than mental illness. They can’t tell what is happening, but they avoid thinking it would be due to mental illness, preferring to “wish” that Caden’s change was caused by his age and environment. Finally, the verse, “Because tomorrow might be good for somethin’,” also echoes with the ending of the book, “But it’s not going to happen today”-and there is a deep, abiding comfort in that. “Deep enough to carry me through till tomorrow”.

Lyrics:

All day starin’ at the ceilin’ makin’
Friends with shadows on my wall
All night hearing voices tellin’ me
That I should get some sleep
Because tomorrow might be good for somethin’
Hold on, feelin’ like I’m headed for a breakdown
And I don’t know why

But I’m not crazy, I’m just a little unwell
I know, right now you can’t tell
But stay a while and maybe then you’ll see
A different side of me

I’m not crazy, I’m just a little impaired
I know, right now you don’t care
But soon enough you’re gonna think of me
And how I used to be, me

I’m talkin’ to myself in public, dodging glances on the train
And I know, I know they’ve all been talkin’ about me
I can hear them whisper, and it makes me think
There must be somethin’ wrong with me
Out of all the hours thinkin’, somehow I’ve lost my mind

But I’m not crazy, I’m just a little unwell
I know, right now you can’t tell
But stay a while and maybe then you’ll see
A different side of me

I’m not crazy, I’m just a little impaired
I know, right now you don’t care
But soon enough you’re gonna think of me
And how I used to be

I’ve been talkin’ in my sleep
Pretty soon they’ll come to get me
Yeah, they’re takin’ me away

I’m not crazy, I’m just a little unwell
I know, right now you can’t tell
But stay a while and maybe then you’ll see
A different side of me

I’m not crazy, I’m just a little impaired
I know, right now you don’t care
But soon enough you’re gonna think of me
And how I used to be yeah, how I used to be
How I used to be
How I used to be
Well, I’m just a little unwell
How I used to be
How I used to be
I’m just a little unwell…

Blogging Assignment #2: The Hate U Give

“Black, Brown, and White” by Big Bill Broonzy was written as a protest song “which addressed the experiences of black war vets and the painful issue of preferential treatment by gradations of skin color.”

I first heard this song when watching the documentary “I Am Not Your Negro” based on James Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript. I chose this song because both the song and the book (also the documentary) discuss/portray/reflect the real situation of black people in America; how they are still experiencing injustice because of their race. It is just like it is said in the song

Your white, your alright

Your brown, stick around

Your black, you stay back

In both the book and the song, you can see/hear how the blacks are mistreated while the whites are “protected” either through the shooting of Khalil(book), the unequal payment(song), unjust society, etc.

Lyrics:

This little song that I’m singin’ about
People you know it’s true
If you’re black and gotta work for a living
This is what they will say to you
They says if you was white, should be all right
If you was brown, stick around
But as you’s black, m-mm brother, git back git back git back

I was in a place one night
They was all having fun
They was all byin’ beer and wine
But they would not sell me none
They said if you was white, should be all right
If you was brown, stick around
But if you black, m-mm brother, git back git back git back

Me and a man was workin’ side by side
This is what it meant
They was paying him a dollar an hour
And they was paying me fifty cent
They said if you was white, ‘t should be all right
If you was brown, could stick around
But as you black, m-mm boy, git back git back git back

I went to an employment office
Got a number ‘n’ I got in line
They called everybody’s number
But they never did call mine
They said if you was white, should be all right
If you was brown, could stick around
But as you black, m-mm brother, git back git back git back

I hope when sweet victory
With my plough and hoe
Now I want you to tell me brother
What you gonna do about the old Jim Crow?
Now if you was white, should be all right
If you was brown, could stick around
But if you black, whoa brother, git back git back git back